Beyond the Lights (2014) watch online free, reviews

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The pressures of fame have music superstar Noni (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) on the edge – until she meets Kaz Nicol (Nate Parker), a young cop and aspiring politician who has been assigned to her detail. Drawn to each other, Noni and Kaz fall fast and hard, despite the protests of those around them who urge them to put their career ambitions ahead ofThe pressures of fame have music superstar Noni (Gugu Mbatha-Raw) on the edge – until she meets Kaz Nicol (Nate Parker), a young cop and aspiring politician who has been assigned to her detail. Drawn to each other, Noni and Kaz fall fast and hard, despite the protests of those around them who urge them to put their career ambitions ahead of their romance. But it is ultimately Kaz’s love that gives Noni the courage to find her own voice and break free to become the artist she was meant to be.… Expand

Movie reviews:

Beyond the Lights makes unapologetically damning statements about the music industry’s treatment of women, yet it never feels preachy. It strikes a risky, though successful balancing act between being immensely entertaining as a musical feature and making

The relative restraint of Beyond the Lights is practically a godsend, presenting audiences with a fairy tale grounded in something resembling reality and fractured by external circumstance as much as internal doubts.

Mbatha-Raw is shockingly good in creating both the “Noni” public persona and the real Noni.

Mbatha-Raw continues to be a true revelation in a role that could be not be any more different from her star turn in “Belle” this year.

Even when Prince-Bythewood (Love and Basketball) tries to pack too much around the edges (including critiques of record-industry sexism and the mechanisms of black political fundraising), the romance at the movie’s center remains credible and vibrant.

Beyond the Lights is a strange beast, a music-industry romance that alternates freely between wisdom and mawkishness, caustic entertainment-biz critique and naive wish fulfillment, heartfelt flourishes and soap-opera shenanigans.

The people are pretty, the music scenes are well-staged (they’re supposed to be crude and corny, right?) and we’ve needed a silly romance for a while now. But for all its hugs and kisses, the film refuses to embrace itself.